Autumn Walks Triangle Scarf – Crochet Pattern

Hey there friends!

I’m so excited!  Fall weather is finally here!  Last week we went from shorts and tank tops one day to sweaters and jeans the next.  But it’s okay by me!  Bring on all the fall awesomeness!

I’m so excited to share something I’ve been working on, just in time for fall!  The Autumn Walks Triangle Scarf is here!!  I had an idea for a scarf to pair well with the autumn weather.  Cozy and vibrant, like the colors of autumn, this scarf is perfect for bonfires, walks through the falling leaves, crisp temperatures, with a hot bevy to wrap your fingers around.

I also wanted to make it something simple and quick to make.  So I opted to make it a one-cake scarf, using Lion Brand Mandala yarn.  There are so many different color-ways offered in the Mandala line, you’ll have no problem finding one you like.  Actually, you might have a problem limiting it to one…[hides bag of Mandala yarn cakes behind the door].  With only one cake to make it, this scarf will still give you the beautiful effect of gradient color striping without all the extra ends to weave in.  Win-win!

If you’re new to crochet, have gotten the basics down and want to try a couple of new stitches, then grab your yarn and hook and lets get making!  This pattern has a couple of special stitches: the puff stitch, and a picot border worked over a row of double crochet.  I also use the magic circle to get started, but list an alternate if you prefer not to use the magic circle yourself. For your learning pleasure, I have linked full photo and video tutorials to each of these special stitches in the Stitches & Abbreviations list below.

Autum Walks Tri Scarf

***An inexpensive, ad-free version of this pattern is available as a PDF download on both Etsy or Ravelry.***

Materials List

  • 1 cake Mandala yarn (Centaur colorway used), or approximately 590 yds / 540 m Size 3 DK 100% acrylic yarn
  • Crochet hook in size H / 5 mm
  • Tapestry needle
  • Scissors
  • Stitch marker (optional)

If you would like to see how this pattern works up in a thicker yarn, I’ve done a post to show you using #4 worsted weight yarn here.

Stitches & Abbreviations (US Terms)

Finished Measurements

My finished scarf was 52″ wide x 27″ long (unblocked, not including tassels).  I had just enough yarn left to do the tassels and still have a wee bit left, but very little, less than 5 yards.  I tend to crochet loosely though, so you may consider a different hook size if you don’t achieve the same gauge (below).  Or maybe if your gauge is tighter than mine, you might have enough yarn to make an additional pattern repeat.  It’s up to you!

Also, I mentioned that I didn’t block mine.  I don’t feel it is necessary, and if I’m being perfectly honest, I’m usually too lazy to block something unless I really REALLY need to.  Thankfully, for this pattern, you don’t, because it will stretch naturally with wear!

Gauge

3″ square = 6 rows x 10 dc stitches – I tend to crochet loosely, so you may want to swatch to make sure you achieve gauge. Gauge is most important so that you can complete the scarf within the yardage provided in a single cake of Mandala.

Notes

A printable PDF version of this pattern is available and includes the full pattern, all linked photo and video tutorials, as well as a stitch chart and row checker, gorgeously formatted for ease of use. Find it on Etsy and Ravelry.

  • This pattern is written in US Standard Terms and its difficulty is classified as Advanced Beginner – you’ve got the basics down and are ready to learn some new stitches
  • Blocking is optional. Scarf will stretch with wear.
  • This is a triangle scarf, and in order to form a pretty center point, a ch-2 is used to create a space. These two chains are NOT counted in your stitch counts for the rows.
  • Chain-3s at beginning of solid dc rows count as a dc.
  • Chain-4s at beginning of dc mesh rows count as a dc + ch-1.
  • Chain-2s at beginning of puff stitch mesh rows DO NOT count as a stitch.
  • Stitch counts are given at the end of row instructions in italicized parentheses ( ).
  • The scarf is worked by repeating certain blocks of rows (specifically Rows 3 – 12). The repeat will look like this:
    • 1 dc mesh row
    • 1 solid row
    • 1 ps mesh row
    • 1 solid row
    • 1 dc mesh row
    • 5 solid rows

Pattern

Part 1: Getting started

This pattern is worked from the center of the long edge out, increasing (putting two or more stitches into the same stitch) at both the beginning and final stitch of the row.  It will use rows of solid double crochet, double crochet mesh, and puff stitch mesh, as indicated next to the Row #, to create the pattern repeat.  Chain stitches at the beginning of double crochet and double crochet mesh rounds DO count as a stitch, however the chain stitches at the beginning of puff mesh rows DO NOT count.  Please also note that the ch-1 used to close a puff stitch as described on page 6 DOES NOT count as the chain stitch indicated in the puff mesh row instructions. Stitch counts are given in italicized parentheses ( ) at the end of each row.

Begin with a magic circle. If needed, you can find a full tutorial hereAlternative: chain three, slip stitch into first chain, forming a loop.  Work R1 stitches into that loop.

R1 (solid): ch 3 (counts as a stitch here and all solid rows), dc 2, ch 2, dc 3, turn. (6)

PRO TIP: When you see a stitch instruction with a number AFTER it, as above with “dc 2” that means to work one double crochet in each of the next two stitches.  Similarly, “dc 3” means to work one double crochet in each of the next three stitches.

R2 (solid): ch 3, dc in base of the ch-3, dc in each stitch across until you reach the ch-2 sp of previous row, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into ch-2 sp, dc in each stitch across until you reach the last stitch (the ch-3 of the previous row), 2 dc into the top of the ch-3, turn. (12)

NOTE: If your stitch counts are off at the end of your rows, you most likely missed an increase stitch at the beginning or end of your row.

PRO TIP: You’ll notice that the beginning ch-3 and first dc, which count as our first two dc sts, are worked into the same stitch from the previous row.  Similarly, at the end of the row where you see “2 dc into the top of the ch-3,” that means to work two dc sts into the third chain used to start the previous row.  Working 2+ double crochets into a single stitch is known as a “double crochet increase,” or more simply as an “increase,” and that is how we grow our triangle.

PRO TIP: Stitch instructions that appear in brackets [ ] are all to be worked into the same stitch, in this case the ch-2 space from the previous row.

Part 2: Pattern Repeat

From here we begin the block of rows that will constitute our “pattern repeat.”  You will continue repeating the following rounds in the order they are written until you are starting to run out of yarn.  I was able to work a total of 3.5 repeats.

R3 (dc mesh): ch 4 (counts as a dc + ch 1 here and all dc mesh rows), dc in base of the ch-4, ch 1, sk 1, *dc in next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until the ch-2 space of previous row, [dc, ch 2, dc] into ch-2 space, ch 1, sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until last stitch, [dc, ch-1, dc] into the top of the ch-3, turn. (10 dc, 8 ch-1)

R4 (solid): ch 3, dc in base of the ch-3, dc in each ch-1 sp and stitch across until ch-2 space from previous row, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into ch-2 sp, dc into each stitch and ch-1 sp across until last stitch, 2 dc into the top of the ch-3, turn. (24)

R5 (ps mesh): ch 2 (does NOT count as a stitch here or any puff mesh rows), [puff, ch 1, puff] into same, ch 1, sk 1, *puff, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until the ch-2 sp of previous row, [puff, ch 2, puff] into ch-2 sp, ch 1, sk 1, *puff, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until last stitch, [puff, ch 1, puff] into the top of the ch-3, turnch-2, (ps, ch-1, ps) into same, ch-1, sk 1, *ps, ch-1, sk 1, repeat from * until the ch-2 sp of previous row, (ps, ch-2, ps) into ch-2 sp, ch-1, sk 1, *ps, ch-1, sk 1, repeat from * until last stitch, (ps, ch-1, ps) in last stitch, turn.

NOTE: A full photo and video tutorial for the Puff Stitch is available here.

NOTE: There will be a total of 2 chains between puffs, but since the first chain is actually part of the puff stitch construction, it is not counted in our stitch count: The chain-2 at the beginning of this row does NOT count as a stitch.  Also, there will be a total of 2 chains between puffs, but since the first chain is actually part of the puff stitch construction, it is not counted in our stitch count.  See photos below. (16 ps, 14 ch-1)

R6 (solid): ch 3, dc in base of the ch-3, dc in each ch-1 sp and puff across until ch-2 space from previous row, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into ch-2 sp, dc into each puff and ch-1 sp across until last stitch, 2 dc in top of the last puff, turn. (36)

R7 (dc mesh): ch 4, dc in base of the ch-4, ch 1, sk 1, *dc in next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until the ch-2 space of previous row, [dc, ch 2, dc] into ch-2 space, ch 1, sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * until last stitch, [dc, ch 1, dc] into top of the ch-3, turn.  (22 dc, 20 ch-1)

R8 (solid): ch 3, dc in base of the ch-3, dc in each ch-1 sp and dc across until ch-2 space from previous row, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into ch-2 sp, dc into each stitch and ch-1 sp across until last stitch, 2 dc into top of the ch-3, turn. (48)

R9-12 (solid): ch 3, dc in base of the ch-3, dc in each stitch across until you reach the ch-2 sp of previous row, [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into ch-2 sp, dc in each stitch across until you reach the last stitch, 2 dc into top of the ch-3, turn. (R9: 54, R10: 60, R11: 66, R12: 72)

That’s the first pattern repeat! One down, two and a half more to go!

PRO TIP: When you see the phrase “pattern repeat,” it is specifically referring to the block of rows or rounds that will be repeated over and over through the end of the pattern.  Being told to work 3 pattern repeats means that you work 3 sets of blocks in total.  It does NOT mean to work them once then repeat the block 3 MORE times unless it actually says “more.”  Having the word “repeat” can be confusing because by definition it means doing something again.  So instead, think of it as the “pattern block” instead of the “repeat.”

Rows 13 – 37, continue repeating Rows 3 – 12 until you are running out of yarn.  I had 3 total repeats plus a repeat of Rows 3 – 7, before going on to the last row of solid double crochet with picot edging.

Repeat 2: (R13: 40 dc, 38 ch-1 sp) (R14: 84 dc) (R15: 46 puff, 44 ch-1 sp) (R16: 96 dc) (R17: 52 dc, 50 ch-1 sp) (R18: 108 dc) (R19: 114 dc) (R20: 120 dc) (R21: 126 dc) (R22: 132 dc)

Repeat 3: (R23: 70 dc, 68 ch-1 sp) (R24: 144 dc) (R25: 76 puff, 74 ch-1 sp) (R26: 156 dc) (R27: 82 dc, 80 ch-1 sp) (R28: 168 dc) (R29: 174 dc) (R30: 180 dc) (R31: 186 dc) (R32: 192 dc)

Half Repeat: (R33: 100 dc, 98 ch-1 sp) (R34: 204 dc) (R35: 106 puff, 104 ch-1 sp) (R36: 216 dc) (R37: 112 dc, 110 ch-1 sp)

Part 3: Picot Edging

Picots will give your new scarf just the right finishing touch! We will work a final row of solid double crochet as described in Row 8, but we will work a chain-3 picot every other stitch. Click here to see a full photo and video tutorial.

R38 (border): ch 6 (counts as double crochet + ch-3), slip stitch into 4th ch from hook (makes first dc with picot), dc into base of the ch-6, *dc with picot into ch-1 sp, dc in next stitch, repeat from * across until ch-2 sp from previous row, [ch 1, dc with picot, ch 1] into ch-2 sp, *dc into next stitch, dc with picot into ch-1 sp, repeat from * across until last stitch, [dc, dc with picot] into top of the ch-3. (225 dc, 113 picot, 2 ch-1)

Tie off, weave in ends.

Part 4: Tassels (Optional)

If you wish to add tassels to your work, make as many as you want, as long as you want.  I made 3 tassels at 4 inches or roughly 10 cm long that I secured at each of the corners of my scarf.  Others have made only 2 tassels to attach at the ends of the longest edge of their scarves.  Others have left them off completely.  It’s up to you!

Written instructions follow, but if you would like a full tutorial, click here.

  1. With your cardboard in hand, line up the end of your yarn with the bottom edge of your cardboard and hold it securely with your finger.
  2. Wrap your yarn around the folded cardboard 20+ times, the more you wrap, the fuller your tassel will be.  Line up your working yarn tail to the bottom edge, as you did in Step 1, and cut.
  3. Cut an 8″ piece of yarn, and insert it between the yarn and the cardboard and tie a knot at the very top.  Leave the tails.  This will be the top of your tassel.
  4. Slide the yarn off your cardboard and keep it in an ‘O’ shape with your knot at the top.  Cut the yarn at the bottom of the ‘O.’  Now you’ve got an upside-down ‘U’ with a knot at the top.
  5. Cut another 8″ piece of yarn, and tie it around your yarn, about 1″ from the top of the tassel, tie a knot, then wrap the tails around the tassel back to the starting point and tie another knot.  Use a tapestry needle to thread the tails from this knot down into the center of the tassel.
  6. Secure your 3 completed tassels to the picots at each of the three corners of your scarf.  Use a tapestry needle to thread the tails back down the center of the tassels or weave them into the fabric of your scarf.
Congratulations

You did it!  You’re ready to take a walk in the crisp autumn air, enjoy the changing colors of leaves, drink some hot apple cider next to a bonfire, and bask in the gloriousness that is fall.

If you’d like to try a chunkier version of this scarf, see my Autumn Walks Reboot, where I work a variation of this pattern with #4 worsted weight yarn.

I hope you enjoyed this pattern!  Share your makes with me on Instagram and / or Facebook!  Use the tags #AutumnWalksScarf and #labellevieforme.

If you have any questions or problems, I’m here to help! Email me at [email protected].

Happy walking in your new scarf!


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© Kristen Caldwell| Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust
All rights reserved. This design, pattern, images and any videos are the property of Kristen Caldwell via La Belle Vie Mais Oui and HooksBooksAndWanderlust.com. This pattern is for personal use. Items made using this pattern can be sold with credit given to Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust. In accordance with U.S. copyright laws, you may not alter, sell, or distribute this pattern in whole or in part, in any way without express written permission from Kristen Caldwell.

2 thoughts on “Autumn Walks Triangle Scarf – Crochet Pattern

  1. Cassie Roth says:

    Hi,
    Just started the autumn walks triangle scarf and am already confused on row one🙄. How is it only 6 stitches? Even if I don’t count the chain 3 at th3 beginning, it’s 7 stitches?

    Thanks for your help.

    • Hooks Books & Wanderlust says:

      Hi Cassie, thanks for your question, and for reaching out. I was remiss in my stitch counts to point out that the stitch count was for the number of dc sts in the row, so counting your ch3 as a dc, you would have 6 dc + 2 ch = 8 total sts for the round. I appreciate you pointing it out and I will update the pattern accordingly 😊

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