Cozy Fireside Wrap

***A beautifully laid out printable PDF version of this pattern is available in my Etsy and Ravelry stores for a small fee, which helps me keep bringing you more free patterns!***

Hi everyone!

I don’t know about you, but the heat and humidity of St. Louis have me praying for the cooler temps of Fall. That said, with as fast as Summer is flying by, I think Fall will be here before we know it. That’s why I’m so excited to share this beauty with you!!

I started working on this design back in the Spring, and I’ve been teasing you with pictures of it on Instagram and Facebook for weeks as I finished writing it up and testing it. I am so glad that I was able to get it done while we still had a few chilly Spring evenings to take advantage of. I am so excited to build a fire and wrap myself up in this super cozy wrap. I just know you will love this new design as much as me! And did I mention POCKETS!?

Introducing my new pocket scarf pattern…The Cozy Fireside Wrap!

I don’t know if you noticed the trend, but pocket scarf patterns have been popping up everywhere lately, and I just HAD to add my own variation to the mix!

Combining open lace stitches with texture and a little boho flair, this design is beautiful, cozy, and functional. And since most of it is just double crochet, with a couple special stitches (foundation double crochet, yarn over slip stitch), this is the perfect pattern for an adventurous beginner to work up.

What do you say we get on to the good stuff now? On to the pattern!

The Cozy Fireside Wrap

by Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust

***An inexpensive, convenient printable version of this pattern is available for purchase in my Etsy and Ravelry stores, complete with full color photo tutorials for both the Foundation Double Crochet and the Yarn Over Slip Stitch, with links to supplemental videos for both, as well as a helpful stitch chart. Purchasing the printable version helps fund the upkeep of this website. Thank you for your support!

Materials List

  • Approximately 1325 yds / 1215 m of a Category 4 worsted weight yarn, Caron Simply Soft in Heather Gray shown here.
  • 10 mm crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Scissors
  • Stitch markers

Stitches & Abbreviations (US Terms)

  • Chain (ch)
  • Skip (sk)
  • Single crochet (sc)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Foundation double crochet (Fdc) – full tutorial available here
  • Yarn over slip stitch (yo sl st)- full tutorial available here

Finished Measurements

Average adult woman
63* x 19 in / 160 x 48 cm unblocked
69* x 21 in / 175 x 54 cm blocked
*not including fringe

Gauge

4 in / 10.2 cm = 9 dc x 5 rows**
**Not essential so much as drape and length. See following Notes.

Notes

  • This pattern is written in US Standard terms and is classified as Advanced Beginner
  • Photo and video tutorials for the special stitches of this pattern are linked here: Foundation Double Crochet; Yarn Over Slip Stitch
  • This pattern is worked holding two strands of CYC Medium 4 weight yarn together
  • This pattern as written should fit an average adult woman’s height / arm length, but can be altered for length by increasing / decreasing the number of foundation stitches, so long as you end with a stitch multiple of 2 + 1.  Just keep in mind that you will need more / less yarn respectively.
  • Gauge isn’t terribly important in this pattern so much as drape and length.  You don’t want to size down your hook if you can avoid it, as that will create a much denser fabric.  Stick with a 10 mm hook, but adjust the starting number of foundation double crochet stitches in the body to meet the length best suited for your body.  See next bullet.
  • To determine the length that best suits you, measure from the knuckles of your hand around your neck to the knuckles of the other hand.  I recommend having someone else take your measurement for the most accurate number.
  • Chain stitches at beginning of rounds do not count as a stitch except where otherwise noted.
  • Blocking is recommended to open up your stitches and give a more polished look
    • Based on numbers from my testers, using various different brands of CYC 4 yarn, there was an average 10% increase in length (long sides) and 17% increase in width (short sides).
  • If you’d prefer a convenient, printable PDF version of this pattern, which includes both special stitch photo tutorials (Fdc and yo sl st) with links to video tutorials for each, as well as a helpful stitch chart- available in the paid pattern only – for visual reference, visit my Etsy and Ravelry shops!

Pattern

You will work this pattern holding two strands of yarn together, which is most easily done using two separate balls, skeins, etc.  You will work in turned rows, with a noticeable front/right side (RS) and back/wrong side (WS).  Chain stitches at the beginning of rows will not count as a stitch except where otherwise stated.  Stitch counts are included in ( ) at the end of the row instructions.

Part 1: Body

The body of your wrap is going to be a basic rectangle.  You will work stitches in a multiple of 2 + 1 to create the length of your wrap.  Unblocked, your rectangle should measure approximately 63 x 19 in (160 x 48 cm).  If you wish your wrap to be shorter / longer, work fewer / more foundation stitches respectively, maintaining a total stitch count of 2 + 1.  To determine the best length for your body, measure from the knuckles of one hand around the back of your neck to the knuckles of the other hand.  If possible, have someone else measure this for you for the most accurate measurement.

R1: Fdc 131.  Turn.  (131)

NOTE: Click here for a tutorial showing you how to make the Fdc.

NOTE: If you prefer to work a foundation chain in lieu of the foundation double crochet, ch 133, dc into the 3rd ch from the hook and into each ch across.  Turn. (131)

R2: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

NOTE: I suggest making the 3rd chain of your starting ch-4 for this row and those throughout a little on the looser side, as you will be working into that chain at the end of the next row.

PRO TIP: Because the chain stitches at the beginning of this row count as a stitch, the “next” stitch is the one that is after the stitch at the base of the chains.

R3: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (131)

Pro Tip: Because the chain stitches at the beginning of this row DO NOT count as a stitch, the first dc is worked into the stitch at the base of the chains.

R4: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

NOTE: Click here for a tutorial showing you how to work the yo sl st

R5: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R6: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R7: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R8: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

R9: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (131)

R10: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

R11: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (131)

R12: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R13: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R14: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R15: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R16: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R17: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R18: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

R19: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (131)

R20: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

R21: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (131)

R22: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R23: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R24: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R25: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (131)

R26: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (66 dc, 65 ch-1 sp)

R27: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across. (131)

Do not tie off.  Rotate your work 90 degrees clockwise and continue working on the side edge.

R1: Ch 1, sc in base of ch-1 and evenly across the side edge of your rectangle.

PRO TIP: I worked two sc per double crochet row and one sc per slip stitch row. (47 sc)

Tie off, then attach yarn and repeat for the other side edge.  You can weave in your ends or leave a tail equal to the length of your fringe, if adding it, to allow the tail to blend.  I chose to add a 5″ fringe, so I left my tails.

Part 2: Pockets (Make Two)

The pockets will imitate the center rows of the body pattern so that they can be attached at the center and aligned when completed.  Unblocked, the pockets each measure approximately 11 x 9.5 in (28 x 25.5 cm).  If you prefer deeper / shallower pockets, add / subtract stitches to the starting number of foundation double crochets.

R1: Fdc 21.  Turn.  (21)

NOTE: Click here for a tutorial showing you how to work the Fdc.

NOTE: If you prefer to work a foundation chain in lieu of the foundation double crochet, ch 23, dc into the 3rd ch from the hook and into each ch across. (21)

R2: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (11 dc, 10 ch-1 sp)

R3: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across, making your final dc into the 3rd chain from the ch-4 of the previous row.  Turn. (21)

R4: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (11 dc, 10 ch-1 sp)

R5: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (21)

R6: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R7: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R8: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R9: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R10: Ch 1, yo sl st in each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R11: Ch 2, dc in base of the ch-2 in the 3rd loop, dc into the 3rd loop of each stitch across.  Turn. (21)

R12: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (11 dc, 10 ch-1 sp)

R13: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across.  Turn. (21)

R14: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), sk 1, *dc next, ch 1, sk 1, repeat from * across, dc last.  Turn. (11 dc, 10 ch-1 sp)

R15: Ch 2, dc in base of ch-2, *dc in ch-1 sp, dc next, repeat from * across. (21)

Do not tie off.  Rotate your work 90 degrees clockwise and continue working on the side edge.

R1: Ch 1, sc in base of ch-1 and evenly across what will be the top edge of your pocket.

PRO TIP: I worked two sc per double crochet row and one sc per slip stitch row. (27 sc)

Tie off, weave in ends!

Part 3: Finishing

Almost done!  It’s time to seam your pockets to your scarf, add fringe (optional), and block (recommended).

Seaming / Assembling

Step 1: Lay your scarf flat with the right side up, one of the side edges toward you.

Step 2: Center your first pocket on top of your scarf, lined up with the bottom edge, just above the row of single crochet.

Step 3: Use stitch markers to hold everything in place while you seam them together.

Step 4: Cut a piece of yarn approximately 3 times the length you will be sewing around the pocket, roughly 90 in (229 cm).

Step 5: Starting in either of the top corners, mattress stitch the pocket to the scarf (see pictures below).

Repeat for second pocket on opposite edge.

Fringe

You may choose to add fringe or not, it’s up to you, but if you would like to, here’s how!  You can also find a video tutorial showing how to add fringe to your project here.

Cut enough strands, twice your desired fringe length, so that you can attach two strands at a time into every other stitch along your edges, approximately 94 strands total. In this example, I chose a 5″ fringe length, cutting my individual strands at 10″ long using the method below.  If you want your fringe to be thinner or thicker, remove or add a strand respectively, or work into each stitch instead of into every other.

Attach your fringe, two strands at a time (or as desired) into every other single crochet stitch along the short ends of your rectangle.

Blocking

Once you have attached all of your fringe, it’s time to block your wrap!  I strongly recommended blocking, as it will open up the stitches of your wrap so beautifully.  And if your fringe is a little curly, or wavy, a little steam will straighten it right out and give your wrap such a polished and professional look.

If you haven’t blocked anything before, it sounds scarier than it is. 

There is wet blocking, in which you give your project a cold bath, gently squeeze the water out (don’t wring it or pull, as it will affect the shape), then roll it up into a towel to soak up as much more water as you can before stretching it out and pinning to some foam blocking boards to dry overnight. I use interlocking foam floor mats like these if you’re curious. 

Or there is steam blocking.  I steam blocked this wrap using my steam iron – well, a quick version of steam blocking, anyhow.  If you want to see the proper way to do it, this video gives you a great explanation, otherwise, read on for my abbreviated version.

DISCLAIMER: steam is HOT.  It will burn you if you’re not careful.
DISCLAIMER: If you used a wool blend yarn, do not steam block or the heat will shrink your wrap.

I laid my wrap out on my blocking mats, adjusted the dial to full steam then working in sections, I hovered the iron about half an inch from your wrap, making several back and forth passes over an area for several minutes allowing the steam to permeate the fibers.  DO NOT let the iron touch the yarn, or you will be sad.  When you have finished steaming that area, CAREFULLY, use your hands to smooth out the wrap and open up your stitches.  Repeat this process until you have steamed the entire wrap, doing touch ups here and there as needed.  Allow it to dry overnight, as steam is still water and this process will make your wrap wet.  Then wake up the next morning and go wrap yourself up in your new wrap!

You did it!  So cozy, right?!  I wore mine around the campfire a few chilly nights this past spring and it already has that wood fire scent, and I love it!  I hope you’re able to enjoy sitting cozy around a fire with your new wrap, keeping your hands warm inside those snuggly pockets. 

I hope you enjoyed this pattern and found it easy to follow!  If not, or if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask!  Email me at [email protected] I would LOVE to see your make!  Should you choose to share, use the tag(s) #CozyFiresideWrap and /or #LaBelleVieForMe to share your makes with me @HooksBooksWanderlust on Instagram and / or Facebook!

Until next time!

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© Kristen Caldwell| Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust
All rights reserved. This design, pattern, images and any videos are the property of Kristen Caldwell via La Belle Vie Mais Oui and HooksBooksAndWanderlust.com. This pattern is for personal use. Items made using this pattern can be sold with credit given to Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust. In accordance with U.S. copyright laws, you may not alter, sell, or distribute this pattern in whole or in part, in any way without express written permission from Kristen Caldwell.

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