Granite Stitch 3 Ways

Hey hey! It’s time for another stitch tutorial!

Today I want to show you how to crochet the granite stitch in THREE ways! First, I’ll show you the traditional method, then two modified versions, one of which I use in my Granite Stitch Kitchen Cloth.

The granite stitch, also known as the linen stitch or the moss stitch, is a 2-stitch, 2-row/round repeat pattern created with single crochets and chains, alternating them for as long as your pattern tells you.  Each successive row/round of granite stitch is made by working the single crochets into the chain-1 spaces created in the previous row/round.

The traditional method requires a multiple of 2+1 so that you can begin and end each row/round with a single crochet. This means that some rows will have two single crochets beginning and ending them. It takes away from the visual pattern a bit for me, so I usually prefer the modified method I’ll show you. The modified version allows you to work in multiples of 2, perfect for either flat rows or joined rounds, without ever breaking the visual effect of the stitch pattern. But before we get to that, let’s learn the traditional method first.

If you’d like to skip the photos and go straight to the video, which covers all three ways as well, you’ll find that here and below the photo tutorials in this post.

Traditional Granite Stitch

As stated above, the traditional method requires a stitch multiple of 2+1. For my swatch here, I started with 11 single crochets to act as a foundation for my granite stitch. Each row of granite stitch begins and ends with a single crochet.

"Traditional Granite Stitch Set Up
Multiple: 2+1
Chain 12, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each across.  You should have 11 single crochet stitches."

When working into a row of non-granite stitches, your first row of granite stitch will follow these steps:

That’s your first row of granite stitch! Now, on to row 2, where you’ll work the granite stitch on top of a row of granite stitch. The thing to remember is that you’ll be working single crochets into the chain-1 spaces from the previous row and skipping the single crochets in favor of a chain stitch. The exception to this of course is always beginning and ending your row with a single crochet. See the following pictures.

Once you’ve got that down, row 3 is a snap:

Congrats! You did it! That’s the traditional method! But what if you want to work in the round, or need to use an even number of stitches for some other reason?

Modified Granite Stitch with a Chain Space Start

This modified technique uses a stitch multiple of 2, and because it uses an even number of stitches, it is only a one-row repeat! For this swatch, I started with a row of 10 single crochets.

The modification will begin with a chain 2, which counts as a chain-1 space, (one chain for the row height, and one chain as the first chain 1 of our granite stitch), then continue alternating single crochets and chain 1s across, ending with a single crochet in the last stitch. As you can tell already, this differs from the traditional method because it starts with a chain space instead of a single crochet.

Essentially, you will begin with a chain-1 space and end with a single crochet for each row of this modified granite stitch.

"Modified Granite Stitch with Chain Space Start; Multiple: 2; Chain 11, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across. You should have 10 single crochet stitches."

When working into a row of non-granite stitches, your first row of granite stitch will follow these steps:

That’s your first row of granite stitch! Now, on to row 2, where you’ll work the granite stitch on top of a row of granite stitch. Remember that you’ll be working single crochets into the chain-1 spaces from the previous row and skipping the single crochets in favor of a chain stitch.

That’s it! But what if you needed to start with a single crochet and end with a chain space for some reason?

Modified Granite Stitch with a Single Crochet Start

Similar to the chain space start above, this modification uses a multiple of 2 and a single row repeat. Again, I started my swatch with a row of 10 single crochet stitches. This variation flips the starting/ending stitch type. Instead of beginning with a chain space and ending with a single crochet, this variation will start with a single crochet and end with a chain space.

"Modified Granite Stitch with Single Crochet Start; Stitch Multiple: 2. Chain 11, single crochet in 2nd chain from hook and in each chain across. You should have 10 single crochets."

When working into a row of non-granite stitches, your first row of granite stitch will follow these steps:

That’s your first row of granite stitch! Now, on to row 2, where you’ll work the granite stitch on top of a row of granite stitch. Remember that you’ll be working single crochets into the chain-1 spaces from the previous row and skipping the single crochets in favor of a chain stitch.

That’s it! You’re a granite stitch ninja master now!

Granite Stitch 3 Ways Video Tutorial

If you want to see these methods in action, I’ve recorded a video tutorial for you as well!

That’s the granite stitch in three different ways. So no matter how you want to work the granite stitch, you’re covered! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial! If there’s a stitch you’d like to see me make a tutorial for, let me know in the comments below!

Until next time!

Pinterest Image: Granite Stitch 3 Ways Photo and Video Tutorial; www.hooksbookswanderlust.com

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