Isla Tank Top

**Sponsored Post: Yarn for this design was provided by WeCrochet.**

**Please note that this post may contain affiliate links, meaning I may make a small commission if you purchase through the links within this post at no additional cost to you. Please see my Full Disclosures + Privacy Policy for more details.**

Hi there, friends!

Just in time for summer, I’ve got the perfect breezy top to keep you cool when those temps soar…the Isla Tank Top!

One thing about these meds I’m on to keep the cancer away is that they force me into early menopause, complete with hot flashes. Needless to say, summers have been extra toasty around these parts and I knew that this summer I wanted something to keep me cool.

Enter RaeLynn of Itchin’ For Some Stitchin’ and Hannah of HanJan Crochet and the Summer Designer’s Pick Blog Hop! WeCrochet sponsored the whole event and I knew that their KnitPicks Shine Sport would be PERFECT for this project!

The Stitches

I don’t know if you’ve seen my last two patterns, but I’ve been kind of OBSESSED with the iris stitch. For this top, I wanted to use that stitch, but in an open and airy way, so I alternated iris stitch with double crochets and chain spaces to give it that open stitchwork. But I also wanted some structure, so I opted to break up the sections of iris stitch with granite stitch (aka moss stitch or linen stitch).

The Yarn

Summer means cotton, and that cotton helps with the overall structure of the garment as well. KnitPicks Shine Sport, a CYC 2 sport weight yarn with its range of beautiful colors would be perfect for this project! The hardest part was choosing a color!

Before we get to the pattern, how would you like to hear about a way you can get not only THIS printable PDF pattern for free, but ALSO 31 others?

Summer Designer’s Pick Blog Hop

As I mentioned, RaeLynn (Itchin’ For Some Stitchin’) and Hannah (HanJan Crochet) are hosting a 32-day blog hop June 1 – July 2, 2021. Every day this month (and a couple days into next), a different designer will be featured and you will have a chance to download a free PDF version of the featured pattern, that’s 32 FREE PDF patterns you have an opportunity to snag!

There are two hostesses for this blog hop, so you’ll want to make sure that you’ve got the correct host page for the date you’re looking for. Weeks 1 and 2 will be hosted by HanJan Crochet and weeks 3 and 4 will be hosted by Itchin’ For Some Stitchin’. NOTE: Eastern Standard Time (EST) will be used for this event.

Pattern Bundle

In addition to the blog hop, and for those who don’t want to wait or check back daily, a BUNDLE is being offered featuring all 32 patterns + 2 BONUS patterns! Grab the bundle for US$12.99, over 90% off the combined retail price of these patterns (that works out to about $.37 per pattern), until July 9th, 2021. See a preview of all the designs included and purchase here!

Giveaway

Oh, and I almost forgot the best part, the giveaway!! There are TWO prizes up for grabs. First, FIVE winners will receive a FREE copy of the pattern bundle (or, in the event that it’s already been purchased, the winner will receive a full refund). Second, ONE winner will receive a Classic Wood Craftroom Basics Kit courtesy of WeCrochet, which includes a beautiful birch wood yarn swift, mango wood yarn bowl, and yarn spindle. For details and to enter, be sure to check the host’s page here.

Okay then, on to the good stuff!!

Isla Tank Top Crochet Pattern

by Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust

Please note that this free version is written for a Women’s Size Large Tank Top, which fits bust measurements of 40-42″ / 101.5-106.5 cm.

The pattern notes contain information helpful in adapting this to other sizes and lengths, OR you may purchase the PDF version of this pattern, which comes with three different length options – crop top, tank, and tunic – and is written for sizes XS – L (additional sizes pending pattern testing; if interested, please click here to apply to test for me!).

The PDF features the written pattern, all notes and helpful tips and tricks, full-color supplemental photos, step by step photo tutorials and linked video tutorials for all special stitches (Foundation Single Crochet, Granite Stitch, Iris Stitch, and Single Crochet Decrease), a consolidated pattern stripped down to just round instructions for more experienced crocheters, and a handy stitch chart and round tracker.

Find the PDF version in my Etsy and Ravelry stores.

Materials List

  • 8 skeins of KnitPicks Shine Sport, shown here in Grapefruit, or 800 yds / 750 m comparable CYC 2 sport weight cotton yarn
  • 4mm / G crochet hook
  • Locking stitch markers – WeCrochet offers lots of fun options here!
  • Tapestry needle
  • Scissors
  • Blocking mats and pins – Check out WeCrochet’s selection of blocking tools!

Stitches & Abbreviations (US Terms)

  • Chain (ch)
  • Chain Space (ch sp)
  • Skip (sk)
  • Slip Stitch (sl st)
  • Single Crochet (sc)
  • Double Crochet (dc)
  • Iris Stitch – find the tutorial here
  • Foundation Single Crochet (FSC) – find the tutorial here
  • Granite Stitch – find the tutorial here
  • Single Crochet Decrease (sc2tog) – find the tutorial here

Finished Measurements

Women’s Size Large for bust measurements 40-42″ / 101.5-106.5 cm

Pre-Blocking Measurements*: 21.5″ wide x 23″ long (55 cm wide x 58.5 cm long)
After Blocking Measurements*: 22″ wide x 30″ long (56 cm wide x 76 cm long)

*laid flat, including straps

Gauge

4 iris + 3 (ch1, dc, ch1) = 5” / 12.7 cm Wide
1 iris + 1 (ch 1, dc, ch 1) = 1.5” / 3.8 cm Wide
Pattern repeat = 3.375” / 8.5 cm High
Pattern for gauge below

Pattern for Gauge

See photos and tips in corresponding rounds within the full pattern for help with swatch. Finished gauge swatch should measure 7” x 4” (17.8 cm x 10.2 cm)

R1: FSC 29 (alternately, size up your hook and chain 30, sc into the back bumpof the 2nd ch from hook and each chain across, then return to pattern hook size)
R2: ch 1, sc, *ch 1, sk 1, sc next, repeat from * across
R3: ch 1, sc 2, *ch 1, sk 1, sc next, repeat from * across, sc last
R4: ch 4 (counts as a dc+ch 1), sk 1, iris in ch-1 sp, *ch 1, dc in 2nd sc from hook, ch 1, iris in 2nd ch-1 sp from hook, repeat from * across, ch 1, sk 1, dc last
R5: ch 4 (counts as a dc+ch 1), *iris in ch-1 sp of iris below, ch 1, dc in dc below, ch 1, repeat from * across
R6-8: repeat R5
R9: ch 1, sc, sc in ch-1 sp, *sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, sc2tog, sc in ch-1sp, sc in dc, sc in ch-1 sp, repeat from * across, sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, sc2tog, sc in ch-1sp, sc in ch-3
R10: Rep R2
R11: Rep R3

Notes

  • This pattern is written in US Standard terms and is classified as Advanced Beginner/Intermediate.
  • Adjusting Width: alter for size or tension by increasing or decreasing foundation stitches in multiples of 12, or going up or down a hook size as needed.
  • Adjusting Length: the length of this pattern can be altered by increasing or decreasing full pattern repeats or by adding or subtracting rounds of iris stitch within the pattern repeat in the body section (part 1).
  • Photo tutorials for the Foundation Single Crochet, Granite Stitch, Iris Stitch, and the Single CrochetDecrease with supplemental video tutorials are linked above in the Stitches & Abbreviations section.
  • Chain stitches at the beginning of rounds do not count as a stitch unless otherwise stated.
  • Blocking is required to open up the stitches prior to use.
  • If you’d prefer a convenient, printable PDF version of this pattern, written for 4 sizes (XS – L) with 3 length options (tank, tunic, and crop top), which includes in-document photo tutorials for all special stitches mentioned above (with links to video tutorials for each), as well as a helpful round tracker and a stitch chart for visual reference – available in the paid pattern only, visit my Etsy and Ravelry shops!

Pattern

This pattern is worked in multiples of 12. You can adjust for size or tension by increasing/decreasing the number of foundation chains accordingly or by going up/down a hook size. The garment will be worked in joined rounds from the bottom up, with the join becoming the left side seam of the garment. Chain stitches at the beginning of rounds do not count unless otherwise noted. Stitch counts are given in ( ) at the end of the round instructions.

PART 1: BODY

The body of the garment includes the bottom border and 5 pattern repeats.

R1: FSC 180. Taking care not to twist your work, sl st to the first FSC to begin working in the round. (180)

NOTE: When you’re ready to weave in your ends, you will need to sew the bases of your first and last stitches of this round closed using the tail left from starting your work. Don’t worry, there’s a reminder later!

NOTE: Alternatively, you could chain 181 and single crochet into the back bump (if you don’t know what the back bump is, check out my video here) of the second chain from your hook and in each chain across. You may want to go up a hook size or two for your chain stitches if you choose this method so that it doesn’t pull your work.

R2 (Granite): Ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), sk 1 (the first sc of the round below), sc next, *ch 1, sk 1, sc next, repeat from * around, join to the ch-1 sp at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

PRO TIP: Asterisks (*) indicate the series of stitches to repeat in succession as you work the round.

NOTE: You may consider sizing up your hook size for granite stitch sections if your work is pulling too tightly and you’re more than 1” (2 cm) under 21.5″ (55 cm).

NOTE: This is a modified start to working the granite stitch in the round. To jump to the tutorial, click here and scroll to “Modified Granite Stitch with a Chain Space Start.”

NOTE: When working granite stitch rounds, you’ll notice that due to the even number of stitches in the round, you will always end opposite of what you start the round with. For example, in R2 we start with a “chain,” so we will end with a single crochet as the last stitch of the round.

R3 (Granite): Ch 1, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * around, join to the sc at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

Begin Pattern Repeat

PRO TIP: The words “pattern repeat” refer to the block of rounds that are worked a specified number of times (in this case 5) to complete the bulk of a pattern. It’s the pattern within the pattern, so to speak. In this instance, rounds 4-11 make up the first pattern repeat. It’s still referred to as a pattern repeat even though we haven’t actually repeated anything yet.

R4 (Iris): Ch 4 (counts as a dc + ch 1), *iris in 2nd ch-1 sp from hook, ch 1, dc in 2nd sc from hook, ch 1, repeat from * around until 3 ch-1 sp remain, iris in 2nd ch-1 sp from hook, ch 1, join to the top of the ch-3 at the beginning of the round to close. (30 iris, 30 dc)

PRO TIP: When working your chain-4 at the beginning of this round, you may find it helpful to keep your 3rd chain a little looser than the others, as you will be working into this chain to close the round later. If you struggle with seeing your stitches, you might also consider placing a stitch marker in that 3rd chain to know where to work into later.

NOTE: To view the iris stitch tutorial, click here.

NOTE: If you’re feeling adventurous, you may consider using a standing double crochet for the dc at the beginning of this and similar rounds as I did here. Moogly blog has a great tutorial for it here. If you choose to go this method, substitute the standing double crochet + ch 1 for the chain 4 at the beginning of applicable rounds.

NOTE: Pay close attention to your stitches in this round, as it is quite easy to miss alternating stitches. See following photos. Iris stitches will always be worked into a ch-1 sp followed by a skipped (sc, ch-1 sp) from the round below, and dc stitches will always be worked into a sc followed by a skipped (ch-1, sc) from the round below.

R5 (Iris): Ch 4 (counts as a dc + ch 1), *iris in ch-1 sp of iris below, ch 1, dc in dc below, ch 1, repeat from * around until one iris remains, iris in ch-1 sp of the last iris from the previous row, ch 1, join to the top of the ch-3 at the beginning of the round to close. (30 iris, 30 dc)

R6-8 (Iris): Repeat R5. (30 iris, 30 dc)

R9: Ch 1, sc, sc in ch-1 sp, *sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, sc in dc, sc in ch-1 sp, repeat from * around until last iris, sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, sc2tog, sc in ch-1 sp, join to the first sc of the round. (180)

NOTE: To see my tutorial for the sc2tog, click here.

R10 (Granite): Ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), sk 1 (the first sc of the round below), sc next, *ch 1, sk 1, sc next, repeat from * around, join to the ch-1 sp at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

NOTE: This is a modified start to working the granite stitch in the round. To jump back to the tutorial, click here and scroll to “Modified Granite Stitch with a Chain Space Start.”

R11 (Granite): Ch 1, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * around, join to the sc at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

That completes the first pattern repeat!

R12-43: Continue repeating R4-R11 for a total of 5 repeats (that means 4 additional times). Do NOT tie off.

Image shows the completed Part 1: Body of the garment

PART 2: UPPER BODY

The upper body section picks up after the last round of your final pattern repeat as indicated in the chart on the previous page. This section is made in its entirety using the granite stitch and the number of rows remains the same across all sizes and length options. As such, round numbers will start back over at 1 here to simplify reading this section.

R1 (Granite): Ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), sk 1 (the first sc of the round below), sc next, *ch 1, sk 1, sc next, repeat from * around, join to the ch-1 sp at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

R2 (Granite): Ch 1, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * around, join to the sc at the beginning of the round to close. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

R3-10 (Granite): Repeat alternating R1 and R2. (90 sc, 90 ch-1 sp)

Tie off.

Image shows completed Part 2: Upper Body

PART 3: STRAPS

The straps are made with the granite stitch worked in turned rows. The stitch count per row will be the same throughout this section (5 sc, 5 ch-1 sp).

Stitch markers are helpful in marking the placement of the first row of stitches for your straps. When you’ve finished your straps, use the stitch markers to secure the strap ends temporarily to the back of your top prior to sewing, allowing you to try your top on to ensure a good fit and placement. Keep in mind that the number of rows worked includes negative ease to account for stretching with wear, so don’t be alarmed if the top is snug in your underarm.

Depending on any modifications you have made, it’s possible that you’ll begin working your straps in either a chain space or a single crochet. Two different strap patterns (“Attach to Chain-1 Space” and “Attach to Single Crochet”) follow based on the type of stitch you attach to at stitch numbers E and G per the schematic and chart below.

This diagram titled "Stitch Numbers" shows an oval representing a top-down view of the garment marked with dash marks at the middle of each side of the oval, dividing the oval into quadrants. Those dashes, beginning with the dash on the right side and working clockwise, are labeled "A/1", "B/46", "C/91", and "D/136." To the outside of those labels, the diagram is labeled for the orientation of the garment. Beginning with the dash labeled "A/1" and working clockwise, garment sides are labeled "Left," "Front," "Right," and "Back." Four additional dashes mark the oval on both the front and back, indicating the placement of the straps of the garment. The front side shows two dashes to the right of center dash "B/46", and two dashes to the left, labeled "E/22," "F/31," "G/60," and "H/69" respectively. Similarly, on the back side of the garment, to the right of dash "D/136" are two more dashes with another two to the left of "D/136" labeled "L/159," "K/150," "J/121," and "I/112" respectively. In the center of the oval, with dotted lines connecting dashes J and G and connecting K and F, the area between those dotted lines is labeled "Neck Hole."
NO MODIFICATIONS MADE TO THE PATTERN

Place stitch markers at stitch numbers 22, 31, 60, 69, 112, 121, 150, and 159 (E, F, G, H, I, J, K, and L on the schematic above). This marks the placement your straps.

NOTE: I recommend trying your top on at this point to see how those stitch markers align with your body before you begin working your straps, that way you can shift them if needed.

Attach yarn at stitch number 22, which should be a ch-1 space, and proceed to the “Attach to Chain-1 Space” instructions below.

IF YOU MADE MODIFICATIONS TO THE TOTAL R1 STITCHES

The neck opening of the top is 28 stitches between the strap placements. You can adjust this as needed to suit a well-fitting strap placement, but for the purpose of this pattern/tutorial, we will be using 28 neck opening stitches.

Dividing your total number of stitches from R1 by 4, use stitch markers to mark the 4 quadrants of your top as shown in the schematic above labeled as A, B, C, and D. For this sample, my R1 stitch count was 180, making each quadrant 45 stitches, so I placed markers at stitch numbers 1, 46, 91, and 136 to mark those quadrants.

Next, from stitch number B, count 14 stitches to the right of your marker (NOT including stitch B) and place a new stitch marker in the 15th stitch, this will be stitch number F. In my example, B is stitch number 46, meaning F is stitch number 31. Then starting with the stitch to the right of your just-placed F marker, count another 9 stitches and place a marker in the 9th stitch, which will be stitch number E. In my example, E is stitch number 22. This marks the front placement of your left shoulder strap. Return to stitch number B and begin counting to the left of your marker (this time, DO include stitch number B in your counting) and repeat the above steps for stitch numbers G and H per the schematic above. In my example, G and H are stitch numbers 60 and 69, respectively.

Flip your top so that the back is facing you and repeat stitch marker placement from stitch number D to place markers at stitch numbers I, J, K, and L. In my example, D is stitch number 136, putting my I, J, K, and L at 112, 121, 150, and 159, respectively.

NOTE: I recommend trying your top on at this point to see how those stitch markers align with your body before you begin working your straps, that way you can shift them if needed.

If your stitch numbers E and G are ch-1 spaces, proceed to “Attach to Chain-1 Space.” If stitch numbers E and G are single crochets, then proceed to “Attach to Single Crochet.”

ATTACH TO CHAIN-1 SPACE

R1: Ch 1, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * 3 MORE times, sc in ch-1 sp, ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), then sl st to the top of the next sc from the previous row. (5 sc, 5 ch-1 sp)

NOTE: I moved my stitch marker from stitch number 31 to the stitch just after it so that I could work easily into stitch number 31, just so there’s no confusion when looking at the pictures below.

R2: Ch 1, *sc in ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * 3 MORE times, sc in ch-1 sp, ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), then sl st to the top of the last sc from the previous row. Turn. (5 sc, 5 ch-1 sp)

R3-55: Repeat R2.

Tie off and leave a long tail for sewing, but wait to sew until right shoulder strap is completed.

Attach yarn at stitch number 60 (which should also be a ch-1 space) and repeat the above instructions for the right shoulder strap, then continue to sewing section.

ATTACH TO SINGLE CROCHET

R1: Ch 2 (counts as a ch-1 sp), *sc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1, repeat from * 3 MORE times, sc in ch-1 sp. Turn.

(5 sc, 5 ch-1 sp)

Two arrows point to two different stitches. The arrow on the right is labeled "St E (a sc)" and the arrow on the left is labeled "St F (a ch-1 sp)."  The yarn has been attached at the chain space before Stitch E and a chain-2 has been worked, preparing to start the row of granite stitch with a chain space over Stitch E (a single crochet).

R255: repeat R1.

Tie off and leave a long tail for sewing, but wait to sew until right shoulder strap is completed.

Attach yarn at stitch number G per the chart above and repeat the above instructions for the right shoulder strap, then continue to Sewing.”

SEWING
Image shows the back side of the garment and the completed but unattached straps with 4 stitch markers marking where the straps will be sewn to the back of the garment.

I recommend pinning your unattached strap ends into position per the chart above and trying your top on again at this point to check the fit and placement of the straps before sewing them to the back of your top. Also, keep in mind that the straps are intended to stretch when worn, and that has been taken into account in the number of rows worked. Don’t be alarmed if the side of the top is snug in your underarm, wear and the weight of the top will stretch this out.

Sew your left shoulder strap to the back of your top at stitch numbers 150 and 159 (K and L). Repeat for right shoulder strap at stitch numbers 112 and 121 (I and J). I used the mattress stitch (click for the full photo and video tutorial) technique to sew my straps. Weave in all ends, and don’t forget to sew the bases of your first and last stitches from BODY R1 closed!

PART 4: FINISHING TOUCHES

To give your top a more finished look and to help secure those straps even more, we will work a border around the neck and arm openings—that’s three different openings to border around.

If you’d like to add a couple of modesty rows to the neckline of your neck hole opening, work those rows first, securing the ends of the rows to the side of straps with a slip stitch, then move on to the border.

OPTIONAL MODESTY ROWS

A: The needle indicates where to attach yarn
B: The first stitch in this example row is a ch 1
C: To continue with the granite stitch, the sc from the previous row is skipped and a sc is worked into the ch-1 sp
D: Granite stitch across until the end of the row. Example shows the last stitch is a sc.
E: Slip stitch to the strap to secure the end of the modesty row where the needle indicates.
F: Slip stitch up the strap to begin next modesty row secured to the strap.

BORDER

When you’ve finished the number of desired modesty rows, do not tie off, instead, secure your final modesty row by working a sc2tog in the corner where the neckline meets the strap then continue working the granite stitch around the entire opening, using a sc2tog to turn the corners. Tie off and repeat border around arm openings.

If you opted out of the modesty rows, attach your yarn 2-3 chain spaces to the left of the back corner of the opening, then granite stitch around the opening. Turn corners by working a sc2tog as the last sc of previous side and the first sc of the next side. Sl st to the first sc of the border to close.

PRO TIP: When you work border stitches on the sides of your straps, the key is consistency. It may work out on one side to work a single crochet into the mock chain-1 spaces and chain and skip the single crochets, but other sides might be reversed as you work around your openings. Regardless of where you place your stitch, do it the same way all the way across each side.

BLOCKING

In order to open up the stitches of your top, blocking is crucial. There are several methods available, which you can learn all about in this helpful video by Hooked by Robin. WeCrochet has a bunch of great blocking tools! For various size foam boards, pins, and other tools, check them out here.

For this project I prefer wet blocking (as opposed to spray or steam blocking), in which you give your project a cold bath, gently squeeze the water out (don’t wring it or pull, as it will affect the shape), then roll it up into a towel to soak up as much more water as you can, then lay it out on your blocking boards. If you don’t have foam boards, lay it on top of carpet or rug with a towel under it.

Gently stretch it into shape and pin it to hold the shape. I pinned from side to side, saving the top and bottom edges for last. This allowed me to focus my stretching on the width of my top, getting my tighter granite stitch rounds to open up as much as possible.


Whew! That was a lot, I know, but you did it!! Congratulations!! Garments are one of those things that are a labor of love, but the feeling of wearing something made by your own hand is pretty hard to beat.

I would LOVE to see your top! Should you choose to share, use the tags #IslaTankTop and / or #LaBelleVieForMe to share your makes with me @HooksBooksWanderlust on Instagram and / or Facebook!

I hope you enjoyed this pattern and found it easy to follow! If not, or if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask! Email me at [email protected].


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Pssst! For today only, June 5, 2021, as part of the Summer Designer’s Pick Blog Hop event, you can grab a PDF copy of this pattern for FREE! Click the link below and use the coupon code you got from Hannah’s round-up post at checkout!
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I hope you enjoyed this pattern and found it easy to follow!  If not, or if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask!  Email me at [email protected]

I would LOVE to see your make!  Should you choose to share, use the tag(s) #IslaTankTop and /or #LaBelleVieForMe to share your makes with me @HooksBooksWanderlust on Instagram and/or Facebook!

Happy gifting!



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© Kristen Caldwell| Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust
All rights reserved. This design, pattern, images and any videos are the property of Kristen Caldwell via La Belle Vie Mais Oui and HooksBooksAndWanderlust.com. This pattern is for personal use. Items made using this pattern can be sold with credit given to Hooks, Books, & Wanderlust. In accordance with U.S. copyright laws, you may not alter, sell, or distribute this pattern in whole or in part, in any way without express written permission from Kristen Caldwell.

2 thoughts on “Isla Tank Top

  1. Lynn Geiter says:

    Every day I get the code and go to the download button and every day, it doesn’t show a place to buy it/input code so I have been unable to get ANY of the patterns yet and anticipate being unable to get any of the future patterns either. Its most disappointing and it is the very first blog hop that I have had any issues like this. This also makes this, sorry to say, the worst blog hop I’ve ever (tried to) participated in.

    • Hooks Books & Wanderlust says:

      Hi Lynn,
      I’m sorry you’re having problems. I know most designers are referring to Ravelry for the download, as I am. I can’t speak to the others, but if you’re able to copy the download code from the host page and click the button on my page to download, that will route you to Ravelry and the design page there. At that point, you’ll need to add the pattern to your cart and check out. There is a field at checkout for your coupon code, which will zero it out. I hope this helps!
      xx
      Kristen

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