• Books,  Reviews

    The Wager

    A gripping historical mystery inspired by the life and diary of Martha Ballard, a renowned 18th-century midwife who defied the legal system and wrote herself into American history. Clever, layered, and subversive, Ariel Lawhon’s newest offering introduces an unsung heroine who refused to accept anything less than justice at a time when women were considered best seen and not heard. The Frozen River is a thrilling, tense, and tender story about a remarkable woman who left an unparalleled legacy yet remains nearly forgotten to this day.

  • Books,  Reviews

    Spare

    It was one of the most searing images of the twentieth century: two young boys, two princes, walking behind their mother's coffin as the world watched in sorrow - and horror. As Diana, Princess of Wales, was laid to rest, billions wondered what the princes must be thinking and feeling - and how their lives would play out from that point on. For Harry, this is that story at last.

  • Books,  Reviews

    Finding Me

    In my book, you will meet a little girl named Viola who ran from her past until she made a life-changing decision to stop running forever. Finding Me is a deep reflection, a promise, and a love letter of sorts to self. My hope is that my story will inspire you to light up your own life with creative expression and rediscover who you were before the world put a label on you.

  • Books,  Reviews

    A Haunted History of Invisible Women

    This book seeks to shine a light on women who history would eschew as undesirable or "other" for various reason and lets their story be told with plausible insights into what was really going on. The authors clearly did their research and are very knowledgeable about that which they speak and present these women's stories in a thought-provoking, insightful, and sometimes eerie way.

  • Books,  Reviews

    Under the Skin

    Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and the Health of Our Nation by Linda VillarosaPublished by: Doubleday BooksPublish Date: June 14, 2022Genre(s): Non-Fiction, Racism, Medical HistoryHB&W Rating: 4View on GoodreadsBuy on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Book Depository Synopsis In 2018, Linda Villarosa’s New York Times Magazine article on maternal and infant mortality among black mothers and babies in America caused an awakening. Hundreds of studies had previously established a link between racial discrimination and the health of Black Americans, with little progress toward solutions. But Villarosa’s article exposing that a Black woman with a college education is as likely to die or nearly die in childbirth as…

  • Books,  Books, WIPs, + Sips,  Reviews

    Educated

    The title of the book is Educated, and while education is definitely a central element to the story, the story isn't even about that. It's about abuse in its many and varied forms, the effects of mental illness, and discovering the truth about the world and yourself FOR yourself.

  • An iPad showing the cover image of an audiobook titled "The Condemnation of Blackness" by Khalil Gibran Muhammad lays next to a working crochet project, a ball of cream yarn, and a candle lay on a wooden board on top of a white bedspread.
    Books,  Reviews

    The Condemnation of Blackness – Book Review

    As someone who was raised in the North, I used to believe that I was not racist, particularly because I hail from the northern states, and frown at the outright, in-your-face racism of the South. I mean, the North won the Civil War after all. Clearly we're the good guys, right? I'm ashamed to say that I thought that way for far too long, blind to the systemic racism inherent in everything, even here in the North, and especially that within myself. Thankfully, books like this one were written.